NFL draft 2021: How to watch live today without cable

The NFL draft will be live from Cleveland on ABC, ESPN and NFL Network. You can watch it all live, no cable TV required.

Five quarterbacks are expected to be picked early. Most draft experts predict the Jacksonville Jaguars will select Lawrence from Clemson with the first overall pick, and the New York Jets will take Zach Wilson from BYU with the second pick. Justin Fields from Ohio State, Trey Lance from North Dakota State and Mac Jones from Alabama are the other three quarterbacks expected to come off the board in the first round.

The NFL draft is a three-day event. Here’s everything you need to know to watch all the action without cable.

Clemson quarterback Trevor Lawrence is expected to be the first pick of the 2021 NFL draft.

The NFL draft will be broadcast on ABC, ESPN, ESPN Deportes and NFL Network. Here’s the TV schedule:

On ESPN, Mike Greenberg will serve as host for the first two nights of the draft alongside Mel Kiper Jr., Louis Riddick, Booger McFarland, Chris Mortensen, Adam Schefter and Suzy Kolber. On ABC, Rece Davis will host with Kirk Herbstreit, Desmond Howard and Todd McShay from one set, and Maria Taylor will host from another set with Jesse Palmer and David Pollack. For day three of the draft on Saturday, ABC and ESPN will combine forces with Davis, Kiper, McShay, Riddick, Mortensen and Schefter covering rounds four through seven.

On the NFL Network, Rich Eisen will lead coverage featuring Daniel Jeremiah, Charles Davis, David Shaw, Kurt Warner, Joel Klatt and Ian Rapoport. Peter Schrager and Chris Rose will join the NFL Network’s coverage on Friday and Saturday.

ESPN Deportes will have Spanish-language coverage of the 2021 NFL draft, featuring Eduardo Varela and Pablo Viruega from Monday Night Football.

The Jacksonville Jaguars hold the first pick, followed by the New York Jets, San Francisco 49ers, Atlanta Falcons and Cincinnati Bengals. You can track all of the picks with ESPN’s Draftcast.

Watch live for free: ABC will air all three days of the draft. If you have an over-the-air antenna hooked up to your TV and get your local ABC station, you can watch for free.

Subscription options: The NFL draft will be broadcast on ABC, ESPN, ESPN Deportes and the NFL Network. There will also be a livestream on the WatchESPN app or the NFL Mobile app (or ESPN.com or NFL.com). One caveat: You will need to prove you have a TV subscription (from a cable or satellite provider or live TV streaming service) that includes ESPN or the NFL Network in order to watch live on either app.

Cable TV cord-cutters have a number of options for watching the draft via a live TV streaming service, detailed below.

Sling TV does not feature ABC, but its $35-a-month Orange plan includes ESPN, and the $35-a-month Blue plan includes NFL Network. You can bundle the Orange and Blue plans together for $50 to increase your draft viewing options.

Read our Sling TV review.

YouTube TV costs $65 a month and includes ABC, ESPN and NFL Network. Plug in your ZIP code on its welcome page to see which local networks are available in your area.

Read our YouTube TV review.

FuboTV costs $65 per month and includes ABC, ESPN and NFL Network. Click here to see which local channels you get.

Read our FuboTV review.

Hulu with Live TV costs $65 a month and includes ABC and ESPN but not NFL Network. ESPN Deportes is part of the $5-a-month Español Add-on. Click the “View channels in your area” link on its welcome page to see which local channels are offered in your ZIP code.

Read our Hulu with Live TV review.

AT&T TV’s basic $70-a-month package includes ABC and ESPN, the $95-a-month plan includes ESPN Deportes, but none of its plans include NFL Network. You can use its channel lookup tool to see which local channels are available where you live.

Read our AT&T TV Now review.

All of the live TV streaming services above offer free trials, allow you to cancel anytime and require a solid internet connection. Looking for more information? Check out our live-TV streaming services guide.

Jake Paul grabs Floyd Mayweather Jr.’s hat, and the memes break loose

Stupid thing to do to the former boxing champ, but the memes and jokes are cap-tivating.

That’s Floyd Mayweather Jr. and Logan Paul, but it was the other Paul brother, Jake, that stole the hat.

A planned stunt? Just another Jake Paul stupid decision? Sure seems scripted, since Paul was quick to try and capitalize by selling black baseball caps that read, “gotcha hat.” No one buy them, please?

“You guys think wrasslin is real, too,” wrote one Twitter user.

Said another, “All planned to build the hype.”

Social-media users had fun with it regardless.

We’re likely to see plenty more stuntage before the June 6 fight. Stay tuned.

Social networks struggle to shut down racist abuse after England’s Euro Cup final loss

Social media users have been frustrated at having to perform moderation duties to keep racist abuse in check.

Bukayo Saka of England is consoled by head coach Gareth Southgate.

The vitriol presented a direct challenge to the social networks — an event-specific spike in hate speech that required them to refocus their moderation efforts to contain the damage. It marks just the latest incident for the social networks, which need to be on guard during highly charged political or cultural events. While these companies have a regular process that includes deploying machine-automated tools and human moderators to remove the content, this latest incident is just another source of frustration for those who believe the social networks aren’t quick enough to respond.

To plug the gap, companies rely on users to report content that violates guidelines. Following Sunday’s match, many users were sharing tips and guides about how to best report content, both to platforms and to the police. It was disheartening for those same users to be told that a company’s moderation technology hadn’t found anything wrong with the racist abuse they’d highlighted.

It also left many users wondering why, when Facebook, for example, is a billion-dollar company, it was unprepared and ill-equipped to deal with the easily anticipated influx of racist content — instead leaving it to unpaid good Samaritan users to report.

For social media companies, moderation can fall into a gray area between protecting free speech and protecting users from hate speech. In these cases, they must judge whether user content violates their own platform policies. But this wasn’t one of those gray areas.

Racist abuse is classified as a hate crime in the UK, and London’s Met Police said in a statement that it will be investigating incidents that occurred online following the match. In a follow-up email, a spokesman for the Met said that the instances of abuse were being triaged by the Home Office and then disseminated to local police forces to deal with.

Twitter “swiftly” removed over 1,000 tweets through a combination of machine-based automation and human review, a spokesman said in a statement. In addition, it permanently suspended “a number” of accounts, “the vast majority” of which it proactively detected itself. “The abhorrent racist abuse directed at England players last night has absolutely no place on Twitter,” said the spokesman.

Meanwhile, there was frustration among Instagram users who were identifying and reporting, among other abusive content, strings of monkey emojis (a common racist trope) being posted on the accounts of Black players.

According to Instagram’s policies, using emojis to attack people based on protected characteristics, including race, is against the company’s hate speech policies. Human moderators working for the company take context into account when reviewing use of emojis.

But in many of the cases reported by Instagram users in which the platform failed to remove monkey emojis, it appears that the reviews weren’t conducted by human reviewers. Instead, their reports were dealt with by the company’s automated software, which told them “our technology has found that this comment probably doesn’t go against our community guidelines.”

A spokeswoman for Instagram said in a statement that “no one should have to experience racist abuse anywhere, and we don’t want it on Instagram.”

“We quickly removed comments and accounts directing abuse at England’s footballers last night and we’ll continue to take action against those that break our rules,” she added. “In addition to our work to remove this content, we encourage all players to turn on Hidden Words, a tool which means no one has to see abuse in their comments or DMs. No one thing will fix this challenge overnight, but we’re committed to keeping our community safe from abuse.”

The social media companies shouldn’t have been surprised by the reaction.

Football professionals have been feeling the strain of the racist abuse they suffer online — and not just following this one England game. In April, England’s Football Association organized a social media boycott “in response to the ongoing and sustained discriminatory abuse received online by players and many others connected to football.”

English football’s racism problem is not new. In 1993, the problem forced the Football Association, Premier League and Professional Footballers’ Association to launch Kick It Out, a program to fight racism, which became a fully fledged organization in 1997. Under Southgate’s leadership, the current iteration of the England squad has embraced anti-racism more vocally than ever, taking the knee in support of the Black Lives Matter movement before matches. Still, racism in the sport prevails — online and off.

On Monday, the Football Association strongly condemned the online abuse following Sunday’s match, saying it’s “appalled” at the racism aimed at players. “We could not be clearer that anyone behind such disgusting behaviour is not welcome in following the team,” it said. “We will do all we can to support the players affected while urging the toughest punishments possible for anyone responsible.”

Social media users, politicians and rights organizations are demanding internet-specific tools to tackle online abuse — as well as for perpetrators of racist abuse to be prosecuted as they would be offline. As part of its “No Yellow Cards” campaign, the Center for Countering Digital Hate is calling for platforms to ban users who spout racist abuse for life.

In the UK, the government has been trying to introduce regulation that would force tech companies to take firmer action against harmful content, including racist abuse, in the form of the Online Safety Bill. But it has also been criticized for moving too slowly to get the legislation in place.

Tony Burnett, the CEO of the Kick It Out campaign (which Facebook and Twitter both publicly support), said in a statement Monday that both the social media companies and the government need to step up to shut down racist abuse online. His words were echoed by Julian Knight, member of Parliament and chair of the Digital, Culture, Media and Sport Committee.

“The government needs to get on with legislating the tech giants,” Knight said in a statement. “Enough of the foot dragging, all those who suffer at the hands of racists, not just England players, deserve better protections now.”

As pressure mounted for them to take action, social networks have also been stepping up their own moderation efforts and building new tools — with varying degrees of success. The companies track and measure their own progress. Facebook employs its independent oversight board to assess its performance.

But critics of the social networks also point out that the way their business models are set up gives them very little incentive to discourage racism. Any and all engagement will increase ad revenue, they argue, even if that engagement is people liking and commenting on racist posts.

“Facebook made content moderation tough by making and ignoring their murky rules, and by amplifying harassment and hate to fuel its stock price,” former Reddit CEO Ellen Pao said on Twitter on Monday. “Negative PR is forcing them to address racism that has been on its platform from the start. I hope they really fix it.”

Preakness Stakes 2021: Post time, TV schedule, how to watch horse racing without cable

You don’t need cable to watch the second leg of the Triple Crown today on NBC.

The 2021 Preakness Stakes takes place later today and will be broadcast on NBC. Here’s how you can watch live without cable.

Kentucky Derby winner Medina Spirit will attempt to capture the second leg of the Triple Crown at the Preakness Stakes on Saturday.

The Preakness Stakes takes place today, Saturday, May 15. TV coverage starts at 5 p.m. ET on NBC. Post time is set for 6:50 p.m. ET (3:50 p.m. PT).

If you don’t have cable, you still have plenty of options. The least expensive that doesn’t require streaming is to connect an over-the-air antenna to your TV and watch your local NBC station. You could also check out a live TV streaming service, all of which offer free trials and offer NBC. Not every service carries your local NBC station, however, so check the links below to make sure it’s available in your area.

Shandful of marketsling TV’s $35-a-month Sling Blue package includes local NBC stations but only in a handful of markets.

Read our Sling TV review.

Hulu with Live TV costs $65 a month and includes NBC in most markets. Click the “View channels in your area” link on its welcome page to see which local channels are offered in your ZIP code.

Read our Hulu with Live TV review.

FuboTV costs $65 a month and includes NBC in most markets. Click here to see which local channels you get.

Read our FuboTV review.

YouTube TV costs $65 a month and includes NBC in most markets. Plug in your ZIP code on its welcome page to see which local networks are available in your area.

Read our YouTube TV review.

AT&T Now TVs $70-a-month Plus package includes NBC in most markets. You can use its channel lookup tool to see which local channels are available where you live.

Read our AT&T TV Now review.

Jake Paul vs. Tyron Woodley memes: Light-up trunks, Dude Wipes, that tattoo

Tyron Woodley agreed to get the “I Love Jake Paul” tattoo as long as Paul gives him a rematch, so stay tuned.

Jake Paul is 4-0 after defeating Tyron Woodley on Aug. 29.

As you may have heard, the fighters made a pre-fight bet. The loser gets a tattoo proclaiming their love for the winner. After the fight, Paul told Woodley that he’ll give him a rematch if Woodley follows through on the “I love Jake Paul” tattoo. Huh? Didn’t Woodley already agree to get the tattoo, rematch or no? Anyway, they shook on it, so… round two, anyone?

The tattoo made its way into a bunch of memes, one of which jokes about “Tyron Woodley ducking Jake Paul’s tattoo artist at the venue.”

Boxing trunks aren’t just clothing any more. Paul wore trunks decorated with LED lights, and you just know people had thoughts on that.

Cracked one Twitter user, “Are they going to light up when he’s hit like the outfits in fencing and score a point for Woodley?”

Said another, “Good because soon it’s lights out for him anyways.”

Woodley may not have had LED light-up trunks, but he did have the name of a flushable personal hygiene wipe — Dude Wipes — right across the butt of his own trunks.

The company crowed about it even when Woodley lost, tweeting a little bathroom humor with “Great Fight. We want a #2.:

Paul dominated for the first few rounds, but Woodley started to come back around round 4. And when Paul took a big punch and hit the ropes, social media hit back. Let’s just say people like to see Paul get punched.

“Woodley got to punch Jake Paul in his face multiple times,” wrote one Twitter user. “Win or lose thats a huge W!”

Said another, “Paul won the fight but Woodley had the most significant punch and round of the fight.”

And it wouldn’t be a fight involving one of the Paul brothers if people weren’t declaring that the fix was in.

“The Jake Paul vs Tyron Woodley fight was rigged,” wrote one Twitter user. “Jake nearly died from one punch.”

Said another, “Woodley had Paul seeing stars in round four and came out in round five and didn’t even try to throw a punch. This was a complete set up to try to make Paul seem legit. Now he will fight Fury, who isn’t a real boxer either.”

Paul said after the fight that he might take a break for a while, but fans are already calling for him to fight Tommy Fury, the brother of current heavyweight king Tyson Fury, who easily won his fight on Sunday against Anthony Taylor.

When and how to watch skateboarding at the Tokyo Olympics

Here’s what you need to know.

Skateboarding is at the Tokyo Olympics and it’s been awesome so far.

The park discipline will feature a course that resembles a large basin with lots of dips, twists and turns.

The Park event takes place on the 4th and 5th of August.

The women’s Park Qualification takes place at 8 p.m. EDT (5 p.m. PDT) on August 3. The final takes place 11:30 p.m. (8.30 p.m. PDT) on the same day.

The men’s Park Qualification takes place at 8 p.m. EDT (5 p.m. PDT) on August 4. The final takes place 11:30 p.m. (8.30 p.m. PDT) on the same day.

Skateboarding at the Olympics features two disciplines: park and street.

The park competition will take place on a hollowed-out course featuring a complex series of twists and turns. Park courses resemble large bowls with steep sides, nearly vertical at the top. Skaters send themselves to dizzying heights, performing jaw-dropping spins and tricks midair, and then gracefully bring themselves back down to the bowl to do it all over again on the other side.

The street competition features a straight course with stairs, handrails, benches, walls and slopes to mimic a real street. This kind of skateboarding is characterized by riding along curbs and rails, leaping into the air without using hands, and that familiar grind of board on metal.

Olympic skateboarders will experience at least some of the creative freedom they get in their home parks and streets: They’re free to choose which parts of the course to cover and, of course, which tricks to perform. Also, in an attempt to maintain the feel of the sport, music will accompany each rider.

Only one athlete rides at a time, and competitors get three timed runs to post their best score.

The street discipline mimics what it’s like to skateboard in a city environment. The course will feature rails, benches, curbs and other things you’d find on a real street.

Judges will score athletes based on speed, difficulty, originality, timing, stability and the overall flow of the performance. One important skill judges will be looking for is the ability to seem suspended in midair.

UFC 260 Miocic vs. Ngannou: Start time, how to watch or stream online, full fight card

UFC 260 is just about to start. Here’s everything you need to know…

UFC 260 will be the second time Stipe Miocic has faced off against Francis Ngannou.

Sadly the co-main event, a compelling contest between featherweight champ Alexander Volkanovski and jiu jitsu savant Brian Ortega has been cancelled after Volkanovski tested positive for COVID-19.

Here’s everything you need to know.

This year the UFC entered into a new partnership with ESPN. That’s great news for the UFC and the expansion of the sport of MMA, but bad news for consumer choice. Especially if you’re one of the UFC fans who want to watch UFC live in the US.

In the US, if you want to know how to watch UFC 260, you’ll only find the fight night on PPV through ESPN Plus. The cost structure is a bit confusing, but here are the options to watch UFC on ESPN, according to ESPN’s site:

You can do all of the above at the link below.

MMA fans in the UK can watch UFC 260 exclusively through BT Sport. There are more options if you live in Australia. You can watch UFC 260 through Main Event on Foxtel. You can also watch on the UFC website or using its app. You can even order using your PlayStation or using the UFC app on your Xbox.

Need more international viewing options? Try a VPN. See the best VPNs currently recommended by CNET editors.

Based on previous UFC times, this is the schedule we expect…

Given how volatile and fluid previous fight cards have been in the COVID-19 era, expect this one to chop and change. Here’s where we’re at right now…

Porsche 718 Cayman GT4 RS sets impressive ‘Ring time ahead of November debut

The RS is more than 23 seconds quicker around the Nurburgring than the standard Cayman GT4.

What’s hotter than GT4? GT4 RS.

How awesome? Well, ahead of the GT4 RS’ official debut, Porsche took a nearly completed prototype to Germany’s infamous Nurburgring to set a lap time. In the hands of Porsche development driver Jörg Bergmeister, the GT4 RS lapped the ‘Ring in 7 minutes and 9.3 seconds. That’s on the track’s new, longer configuration; the time for the shorter, more familiar ‘Ring setup is 7:04.511. That makes the GT4 RS a full 23.6 seconds quicker than the regular GT4, which is a super impressive feat.

The prototype used for lapping was fitted with a racing seat in order to protect the driver, but was otherwise stock. The GT4 RS ran on ultra-sticky Michelin Pilot Sport Cup 2 R tires, which Porsche says will be optionally available on the production car.

It’s unclear exactly when in November we’ll see the GT4 RS, though the Los Angeles Auto Show is one possibility. In any case, we’re pretty darn stoked to get behind the wheel of one of these. After all, if the normal GT4 is already so good, the RS is going to be a total chef’s kiss.

Tokyo Olympics week 2: How to watch, everything to know

Week 2 of the Tokyo Olympics is about to begin.

The Tokyo Olympics is here!

The Olympics are back on NBC, with a 24/7 stream online if you verify you’re a cable subscriber. NBCSports Gold will have a dedicated Olympics package — pay an upfront fee and you’ll be able to watch anywhere, uninterrupted by ads.

Tokyo is 16 hours ahead of the West Coast, so watching live should get a good spread of events. It’s a little trickier on the East Coast, where you may have to rely on highlights.

US residents don’t need a cable or satellite TV subscription in order to watch the Olympics on NBC’s family of channels. NBC itself will be the main channel, but you’ll also find coverage on NBCN, CNBC, USA Network, Olympics Channel, Golf Channel and Telemundo. The major live TV streaming services include most or all of these NBC-related channels, and each one includes NBC though not in every market. The Olympics will also stream in 4K HDR on two of the services, FuboTV and YouTube TV. See below for details.

If you live in an area with good reception, you can watch on NBC for free just by attaching an affordable (under $30) indoor antenna to nearly any TV.

Peacock offers three tiers: a limited free plan and two Premium plans. The ad-supported Premium plan costs $5 a month, and the ad-free Premium plan costs $10 a month. Live coverage of the Olympics is available on the free tier for all events except the US men’s basketball games, which require either of the Premium plans.

YouTube TV costs $65 a month and includes NBC, NBCN, CNBC, USA Network, Olympics Channel, Golf Channel and Telemundo. Plug in your ZIP code on its welcome page to see which local networks are available in your area. Read our YouTube TV review.

To watch in 4K HDR you’ll need to subscribe to be signed up for the company’s new 4K option that costs an extra $20 per month on top of the $65 regular monthly rate — although there’s a 30-day free trial that’s long enough to last through the entire Olympics. The 4K feed isn’t available in every market however; here’s the full list.

Hulu with Live TV costs $65 a month and includes NBC, NBCN, CNBC, USA Network, Olympics Channel, Golf Channel and Telemundo. Click the “View channels in your area” link on its welcome page to see which local channels are offered in your ZIP code. Read our Hulu with Live TV review.

FuboTV costs $65 per month and includes NBC, NBCN, CNBC, USA Network, Olympics Channel, Golf Channel and Telemundo. Click here to see which local channels you get. Read our FuboTV review.

Unlike YouTube TV, Fubo’s 4K coverage of the Olympics doesn’t cost anything extra. Unfortunately it’s only available in five markets: New York, Los Angeles, Chicago, Dallas-Fort Worth and Boston.

AT&T TV’s basic, $70-a-month package includes NBC, NBCN, CNBC, USA Network and Telemundo. You’ll need to spring for the $95-a-month plan to also include the Olympics Channel and Golf Channel. You can use its channel lookup tool to see which local channels are available where you live. Read our AT&T TV Now review

Sling TV’s $35-a-month Blue plan includes NBC, NBCN, USA Network, Olympics Channel. You can add CNBC and Golf Channel for an additional charge. Sling does not offer Telemundo. Sling offers NBC only in 11 major markets, so you won’t be able to stream NBC live unless you live in one of those areas. Read our Sling TV review.

All of the live TV streaming services above offer free trials (except Peacock, which just has a free tier), and all allow you to cancel anytime and require a solid internet connection. Looking for more information? Check out our live-TV streaming services guide.

The BBC will cover the games on TV, radio and online in the UK, with more on Eurosport, a pay-TV channel. The time difference there is eight hours, so you’ll have to get up very early in the morning to watch live.

In Australia, the Seven Network will spread free-to-air coverage over Channel Seven, 7Mate and 7Two. It’s a good year for watching Down Under, with Sydney only an hour ahead of Tokyo.

Those participating in the Olympics will have to use Japan’s COCOA Exposure Notification app and be tested for COVID-19 every four days.

Vaccinations aren’t mandatory for Olympic athletes taking part in the games, but many countries are making sure all of its athletes are vaccinated before attending.

The IOC has released a number of “playbooks” for participants, staff and journalists covering the Olympics. If you’re curious, you can read them here.

Tickets initially sold out for the Tokyo Olympics in 2020, but as of right now, spectators will be barred from attending the games in Tokyo and its surrounding areas. Events held outside the area covered by the emergency (like the marathon) will allow spectators, but they’ll be asked not to cheer the runners on the roads, as noted by The New York Times.

We know for sure that international spectators won’t be able to attend. All overseas folks have had their tickets refunded.

Another good question. Despite the fact it’s taking place in 2021, these Olympics are still being officially referred to as the Tokyo 2020 Olympics.

The logo is this checkered circle, designed by Tokyo-based artist Asao Tokolo.

“This chequered design in the traditional Japanese color of indigo blue expresses a refined elegance and sophistication that exemplifies Japan,” the International Olympic Committee explains. The three different shapes within the pattern represent diversity, equality and excitement.

Paris will host the 2024 Summer Olympics, having lost out to London for 2012. The US gets a shot in 2028, when it’ll be in Los Angeles. The Olympics website has cool pages on every games of the modern era, going back to Athens in 1896.